Baldwin, Bethel Park, Bloomfield, Belle Vernon, Bentleyville, Bon Air, Brentwood, Brookline, Carrick, Castle Shannon, Charleroi, Clairton, Donora, Downtown Pittsburgh, Dravosburg, Duquesne, Duquesne Heights, East Liberty, Elizabeth, Elizabeth Township, Elrama, Etna, Finleyville, Friendship, Garfield, Glassport, Glen Hazel, Greenfield, Hays, Hazelwood, Highland Park, Homestead, Homewood, Jefferson Hills, Jefferson, Knoxville, Lawrenceville, Larimer, Library, Lincoln Place, McKeesport, Millvale, Monessen, Monongahela, Morningside, Mount Lebanon, Mount Washington, Munhall, New Eagle, Oakland, Overbrook, Penn Hills, Pleasant Hills, Point Breeze, Polish Hill, Scott Township, Shadyside, Smithton, South Park, Southside, Squirell Hill, Stanton Heights, Strip District, Swissvale, West Elizabeth, West Homestead, West Mifflin, West Newton, Wilkinsburg, Whitehall, PA

At MedPage Today, we are committed to ensuring that individuals with disabilities can access all of the content offered by MedPage Today through our website and other properties. If you are having trouble accessing www.medpagetoday.com, MedPageToday's mobile apps, please email legal@ziffdavis.com for assistance. Please put "ADA Inquiry" in the subject line of your email.


India's cultural view of elderly care is similar to that of Nepal's. Parents are typically cared for by their children into old age, most commonly by their sons.[33] In these countries, elderly citizens, especially men, are viewed in very high regard. Traditional values demand honor and respect for older, wiser people.[34] India is facing the same problem as many developing nations in that its elderly population is increasing tremendously, with a current estimate of 90 million over the age of 60.[35] Using data on health and living conditions from the India's 60th National Sample Survey, a study found that almost a quarter of the elderly reported poor health. Reports of poor health were clustered among the poor, single, lower-educated and economically inactive groups.[36]

The overall goal of stroke care is to minimize brain injury and optimize the individual’s recovery. Preferential transport to stroke-capable centers has been shown to improve outcomes. Stroke centers are equipped with resources often not available at smaller community hospitals. The presence of specialists, including neurologists and stroke care specialists, multidisciplinary teams experienced in stroke care, advanced imaging modalities, and other therapeutic options make transport to stroke centers the most suitable option. The goal of the stroke team, emergency physician, or other experts should be to assess the individual with suspected stroke within ten minutes.
Delivery:  Delivery is the prompt transport of the patient to a hospital, preferably a stroke center. Emergency medical personnel should be trained in performing a rapid assessment of the patient’s condition. If a stroke is suspected, the patient should be transported to an appropriate receiving hospital as soon as possible. A medical history and baseline mental status should be documented. The time since onset of symptoms should also be noted and is referred to as ‘time zero’, or the last time the patient was seen to be normal. Emergency medical workers need to provide pre-arrival information to the receiving facility so that the ED can prepare for the arrival of a potential stroke patient.
The quality of our care is a reflection of our Attendant Caregivers.  We closely evaluate and carefully select individuals who must successfully complete a criminal background check and multiple reference checks.
They are highly qualified individuals who are insured and who are provided with specialized training using the highly regarded American Red Cross Family Caregiving Program.  The strength of the American Red Cross training program lies not only in their expert content, but also in the way this content is delivered.
×